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Could anyone summarize these decisions cases from the Marshall Court?

Could anyone summarize these decisions cases from the Marshall Court? Topic: Case stated
May 25, 2019 / By Candace
Question: Here are the cases: United States v. Aaron Burr, Marbury v. Madison, Dartmouth College, McCulloch v. Maryland and Gibbons v. Ogden I know the overall of Marbury v. Madison, where the supreme court ruled the Judiciary Act of 1789 was unconstitutional (the supreme court cannot rule against federal officials). (Was Judiciary Review already established during the trial of the case such that the supreme court could apply it by declaring the Judiciary Act unconstiutional, or was it later bestowed to the judicial branch after the trial and named it Judiciary Review as a new power for the judicial branch?) What happened to Marbury after the trial? Did he sue Madison again in a lower court? (Did the lower court have the power to rule against federal officials? If so, it would be ironic since the supreme is the highest court and yet cannot rule against federal officials.) I don't really understand the reasons for deciding Burr as not guilty in the case United States v. Aaron Burr.
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Best Answers: Could anyone summarize these decisions cases from the Marshall Court?

Amaliya Amaliya | 6 days ago
All these cases have to do with what powers the Supreme Court has and what they do not. Powers of the Supreme Court were not completely set out but slowly developed as time passed and more cases come into the court. Judicial Review was established during that case, before this time there was no concept of judicial review concerning the Supreme Court it was no looked at as the highest court per say it was seen as being a court to deal with federal issues such as issues between states not cases coming out of state courts. Also when a law and the constitution are in conflict then the constitution always trumpts. In MCCulloch Court ruled that Maryland could not tax the national bank as they did not have the authority. It was stated in this case that the populus gives up some of their rights to the state government and some of them to the federal governemnt in exchange for living within society. Gibbons deals with the commerce clause; this was the first case that dealt with commerce moving over state lines and new ideas about the region of commerce's normal movements.
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Amaliya Originally Answered: How does the system of checks and balances in the U.S. government affect Supreme Court Decisions?
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Amaliya Originally Answered: How does the system of checks and balances in the U.S. government affect Supreme Court Decisions?
The late Alexander Bickel, a law professor at Yale, used to refer to the United States Supreme Court as "the least dangerous branch" because it had neither the power of the sword, which resides in the executive branch, nor the power of the purse, which resides in the legislative branch. All that the Court had, and has, is the power of moral suasion, which hasn't always been enough. For example, when the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that the Cherokees could keep their land despite white Americans' desire for the gold that lay under it, then-President Andrew Jackson was said to have retorted, "John Marshall has made his decision. Now let him enforce it."
Amaliya Originally Answered: How does the system of checks and balances in the U.S. government affect Supreme Court Decisions?
The Supreme Court does change and its members are picked by the President, which has to be approved by by the Senate, not sure of the House, but yes the Supreme Court could be altered to slant one way or another, the current team is Samuel Anthony Alito the the current Chief Justice, John Roberts was put in by Bush, Stephen Gerald Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg put in by Clinton, Clarence Thomas and David Hackett Souter put in by Bush Sr, Anthony McLeod Kennedy and Antonin Gregory Scalia put in by Reagan, John Paul Stevens was put in by Ford, So all together, that makes 2 democratic, 6 republican Associate Justice and the Chief Justice is Republican, most of these changes were made when checks and balances were not in place. PS: My compliments to the people who have done their research, it makes for some interesting reading
Amaliya Originally Answered: How does the system of checks and balances in the U.S. government affect Supreme Court Decisions?
Andrew Jackson needed indian farmland to provide to his wealthy acquaintances. The best court ruled the Indians were human beings and had rights. Jackson suggested "enable the court implement that's determination" and despatched his military and stole the land besides. One recent adventure became the Terry Shiavo case, about eliminating a feeding tube to enable a comotose human being die. The best court ruled that it became legal to do - prompting Republican speaker Trent Lott to threaten the finest court with dropping their jobs. He became way out of line because the court does no longer answer to politicians (or the typical public's vote both). The structure trumps all.

Amaliya Originally Answered: I have a problem making big decisions (or any decisions for that matter) question is at bottom?
From your question- I can tell that you are a procrastinator. Procrastinators put things off until the last minute in favor of doing other, more appealing activities. I suggest that you write yourself a schedule for the day and try to stick to it. Schedule time for school, homework, snacks, and some fun time for relaxing or playing games. Write a schedule every day or use the same schedule for each weekday. Just don't out off writing the schedule! If your school offers a class in time management, study skills, or college planning, try to take it. The only way to break the habit of procrastination is to force yourself to do things that you don't want to do. This means making a concious effort to NOT turn on the television or the computer and do your homework. Since you fear not doing things well, ask yourself if you are doing your best work by putting something off until the last minute and rushing to get it done. Ask yourself how much better you could have done had you put in more time on an assignment. There is no quick-fix forprocrastination and it's going to take work, but you can do it. Don't give up! As for decision making- realize that you are going to make mistakes, and that's okay. Think about what you like to do and make a list of all your skills. The make a list of all the jobs you think you would like to have, if you don't already know. Choose a college that offers a variety of majors so you can switch. It is very common for a college student to change majors (I changed mine the first day I entered school!) and you don't have to know what you want to do before you go to college.
Amaliya Originally Answered: I have a problem making big decisions (or any decisions for that matter) question is at bottom?
Look simple solution is to put your self on a schedule. Have a set time and do it. Do your home work every day at The same time. turn off the TV the video games any distractions. I always make my kids do it right after school. then they can go to their sports and talk on the phone and watch television. Make appointments with colleges so that you feel pressured so you get every thing prepared and ready. fill out the app if the college seems to be one that you are interested in right then and there. Just because you get accepted doesn't mean you have to go to that particular one. Go to someone you trust and tell them you are having trouble making decisions about colleges and ask for advice. to simple to be going on about it. Just do it and get it over with. Then you can get to what you would rather be doing.

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