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What states still use the death penalty? which states don't?

What states still use the death penalty? which states don't? Topic: Nebraska papers
June 27, 2019 / By Beth
Question: I'm doing a paper and i need to find out which states have gotten rid of the death penalty and which states still have it. i also need the year it was updated. any websites would be GREATLY appreciated. thanks
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Best Answers: What states still use the death penalty? which states don't?

Aggi Aggi | 10 days ago
New Jersey, last December outlawed the Death penalty. As to Nebraska, it has a death penalty, but no means at present to carry it out.
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Aggi Originally Answered: How many states in the US have a Death Penalty?
This will be a long answer, but you asked a lot of questions: 14 states and the District of Columbia do not have the death penalty: Alaska, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan,Minnesota, North Dakota, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin 36 states allow it but few execute anyone. The 36 states are: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wyoming In 2006-7, most states carried out no more than 1 execution: Alabama 4, Arizona 1, California 1, Florida 4, Georgia 1, Indiana 3, Mississippi 1, Montana 1, North Carolina 4, Nevada 1, Ohio 7, Oklahoma 7, South Carolina 2, South Dakota 1, Tennessee 3, Texas 50, Virginia 4, The other 33 states carried out no executions at all. Deterrence: Homicide rates are higher in states and regions with the death penalty than in those without it. At the state level, only a conviction for murder can lead to a death sentence. Alternates to freeing dangerous criminals: 48 states have life without parole on the books (all except Alaska and New Mexico.) It means exactly what it says. My opinion about the wisdom of the death penalty for crimes other than homicide, that is for molesting a child, with the safety and well being of the victim in mind: •First of all, to avoid the death penalty the rapist is more likely to kill the key and only eyewitness, namely his victim. •Secondly, rape and abuse of children is already one of the most underreported crimes, because they are most often committed by fathers, uncles, and family friends. If the perpetrator can face the death penalty, the crime will be even less likely to be reported. •Additionally, children who are victims of rape and abuse often carry a heavy load of guilt which would be made much worse if the victimizer is executed. •Last of all, defendents in rape cases have been misidentified by victims. Take a look at www.innocenceproject.org for information about cases where rape victims identified the wrong person. Children have also been manipulated into making accusations of rape and abuse where no such crimes even occurred. If you need more info feel free to email me. Sources: Death Penalty Information Center, www.deathpenaltyinfo.org, for stats on executions, reports on costs, deterrence studies, links to FBI crime stats and links to testimony (at state legislatures) of victims' family members. FBI http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/cius2006/data/tab...

Tiernan Tiernan
36 states have the death penalty. The best place for this question and any other about the death penalty is the Death Penalty Information Center, at www.deathpenaltyinfo.org.
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Rain Rain
Currently lethal injection is the method used or allowed in 35 of the 36 states which allow the death penalty. Nebraska requires electrocution, although in 2008 the state supreme court ruled that this method is unconstitutional.[24][25][26] Other states also allow electrocution, gas chambers, hanging and the firing squad. From 1976 to September 24, 2007 there were 1,098 executions, of which 928 were by lethal injection, 154 by electrocution, 11 by gas chamber, 3 by hanging, and 2 by firing squad.[27]
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Marlen Marlen
Illinois has it, but hasn't used it in quite a while. The first one put to death that was still fighting it was John Wayne Gacy, the poster child for those in favor of the death penalty. I am in favor of it.
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Marlen Originally Answered: Should the united states have a death penalty? Yes or no?
You don't have to sympathize with criminals to ask if the death penalty prevents or even reduces crime, to look at costs, alternatives and to think about the risks of executing innocent people. Your question deserves facts with credible sources, not eye for an eye sound bites. 130 people on death rows have been released with proof that they were wrongfully convicted. DNA, available in less than 10% of all homicides, can’t guarantee we won’t execute innocent people. If someone is convicted and later found innocent you can release him from prison, but not from the grave. The death penalty doesn't prevent others from committing murder. No reliable study shows the death penalty deters others. Homicide rates are higher in states and regions that have it than in those that don’t. Life without parole, on the books in 48 states, also prevents reoffending. It means what it says, and spending 23 of 24 hours a day locked in a tiny cell is not a picnic. Life without parole costs less than the death penalty. The death penalty is much more expensive than life in prison, mostly because of the upfront costs of legal process which is supposed to prevent executions of innocent people. (upfront=pre trial and trial level) The death penalty isn't reserved for the worst crimes, but for defendants with the worst lawyers. It doesn't apply to people with money. When is the last time a wealthy person was on death row, let alone executed? Families of murder victims are not unanimous about the death penalty. However, even families who have supported the death penalty in principal have testified that the drawn-out death penalty process is painful for them and that life without parole is an appropriate alternative. Problems with speeding up the process. Over 50 of the innocent people released from death row had already served over a decade. Speed up the process and we will execute innocent people. There is a terrific resource specifically for students writing papers or debaters at http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/article.... It has links to both sides (click on curriculum) and is easy to navigate. Sources: Death Penalty Information Center, www.deathpenaltyinfo.org, for stats on executions, reports on costs, deterrence studies, links to FBI crime stats and links to testimony (at state legislatures) of victims' family members. FBI http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/cius2006/data/tab... The Innocence Project, www.innocenceproject.org http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/COcostte... page 3 and 4 on why the death penalty is so expensive http://www.njadp.org/forms/signon-survivor.html for statements of victims’ families

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