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Can I film a remake of Lord of the Flies, based upon the novel without violating copyright?

Can I film a remake of Lord of the Flies, based upon the novel without violating copyright? Topic: First novel writing awards for books
July 16, 2019 / By Bette
Question: I am doing film making for my D of E award and was wondering where copyright came into this as this is one of the things we are required to learn about. Would I be able to use the original speech written in the novel or would I have to adapt it? Am I even allowed to copy the plot legally?
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Best Answers: Can I film a remake of Lord of the Flies, based upon the novel without violating copyright?

Aiah Aiah | 7 days ago
The original copyright holder has rights not only to the original work, but also to any derivative works -- i.e., works that derive from the original work. A film adaptation of a copyrighted book is an obvious derivative work. Like any other film adaptation of a book, you will first need to obtain rights to the book to avoid copyright infringement. http://www.chillingeffects.org/derivativ...
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Aiah Originally Answered: Lord of the flies?
omg I Hate This Book. Exposition: No Idea. Rising Action: When The Kids Start Being Evil... (Roger [I Think] Kicks The Kids Sandcastle Down...) Climax: Simon Talking To TLOTF/His Death Falling Action: Piggy/Ralph Trying To GEt Piggys Glasses Back Then Piggy Dies Resolution: The Navy Comes And Rescues Them This Book Sucks.
Aiah Originally Answered: Lord of the flies?
I read this about 5 years ago, but surely the part where the kids beat the one kid to death with sticks is the climax.

Timothy Timothy
The original copyright holder has rights not only to the original work, but also to any derivative works -- i.e., works that derive from the original work. A film adaptation of a copyrighted book is an obvious derivative work. Like any other film adaptation of a book, you will first need to obtain rights to the book to avoid copyright infringement.
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Timothy Originally Answered: Lord of the Flies - Ralph?
Here is some character analysis about Ralph from Shmoop. Read this, then use the link I'm leaving in sources and also look at him in Symbols, etc.: The text makes it clear that Ralph is elected chief because he's handsome - "attractive" and "fair," as the text informs us. But Ralph is more than attractive. He also has the conch, which symbolizes power. The conch is what enables Ralph to call the boys to the first assembly, setting him up as a natural choice for leader right from the start. "But wait," you say, "Ralph ended up being a great chief!" True, yes, but that brings us to the chicken or the egg question of whether he was a good man for chief or whether being chief made him a good man. Ralph rose to the occasion, but the occasion could have created in him abilities and skills he might not have otherwise displayed. Ralph's own thoughts lend some credibility to this latter notion when he decides "if you [are] a chief, you [have] to think, you [have] to be wise [...] you [have] to grab at a decision." But let's look at some of his innate abilities. To begin, Ralph is level-headed. He seems to be saying, "Look, as much fun as it would be to run around killing each other, let's build a signal fire already and get off this island." He believes in order, rules, and not pooping where he eats (literally). He also rocks out in some interesting moments of profundity and wisdom. When the boys break up the meeting by leaving early, Ralph refuses to call them back on the grounds that, if he blows the conch now and it fails, its power will be lost forever. But we think Ralph's most interesting line comes when he insists "this is a good island." That brings us to the novel's major question: are the boys corrupted by their environment, or were they corrupt to begin with? You could argue that the boys are merely helpless victims to circumstance; they're stuck on an island with no adults, food, rules, or toilet paper, and what can you expect from young boys but chaos and disorder? That's all well and good, but then you remember that Lord of the Flies is an allegory, and the British boys on the island are likened to adults in the real world who are living their own savagery otherwise known as war. So then what can you say: adults aren't at fault, they're just corrupted by their surroundings? Not easily. Ralph's comment "this is a good island" argues implicitly that the problem isn't the island - it's the boys. Ralph solidifies this thought at the end of the novel, when he cries for "the darkness of man's heart." So evil is just inherent in man...right? Maybe - that's the question Golding forces you to ask, and the question that Ralph in his own way and his own wisdom takes a shot at. Yet, despite all his wisdom and leadership and so forth, our young protagonist is far from perfect. To begin with, he's kind of a jerk to the one guy who supports him through thick and thin: Piggy. Ralph makes fun of the kid's asthma, won't defend him to the others, and reveals to everyone Piggy's undesirable nickname. It's more the bloodthirsty stuff that raises our Ralph-examining eyebrows. In case you missed it, check out the end of Chapter Seven, when Ralph hits the pig with his spear and feels a rush of testosterone, thinking that maybe hunting isn't so bad after all. Or you could look at Simon's death scene, which Ralph not only took part in but was able to later convince himself he didn't witness. We even start to think that Ralph got sucked into "the game" at the end of the novel when he feels his sharpened spear and "grins with amusement" that whomever he stabs "will squeal like a stuck pig." Ralph deteriorates in other ways as well. Ralph's one firm stand throughout the novel is his insistence that they keep the signal fire going. But as order and rules go by the wayside, so does the order within Ralph's own head. He can remember that he wants a signal fire, but he can't remember why. He knows it's something to do with smoke, but then he can't put two and two together. Piggy has to help him out repeatedly, and the gap in Ralph's train of thoughts worsens as the novel progresses. You might have reacted to this the same way we did, primarily, "What is going on!?" To answer this question, we went to Ralph's big philosophical moment, right before he calls the meeting in Chapter Five. At this point, Ralph is getting over his anger at the boys for missing their opportunity to get off the island. This is still early in the novel, yet Ralph is already losing touch with reality. He notes that the shadows look different in the evening and asks himself, "If faces [are] different when lit from above or below - what is a face? What is anything?" To translate: as different places, objects, and yes, people are transformed on the island, they start to lose their meaning. This is what happens to the signal fire in Ralph's mind, as well as to the "savages" who he later decides are completely different beings than the Britis
Timothy Originally Answered: Lord of the Flies - Ralph?
i had to do the exact same project... well almost. he represents leadership.... you can put a conch.. he wanted to be rescued.. so maybe fire too! maybe but a leader as the famous person.. good luck.

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