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I am self-learning European Portuguese?

I am self-learning European Portuguese? Topic: How to write a self help book pdf
June 17, 2019 / By Brady
Question: Can someone suggest some books I can read? how can I get all the words to stay in my head? Lastly, what's a good technique for making sentences correct in European Portuguese? Im having trouble with that.. Please help! Thanks :)
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Best Answers: I am self-learning European Portuguese?

Albertine Albertine | 7 days ago
Hi :) You can read these two online books for free: http://books.google.com/books?id=_B3I2jK... http://books.google.com/books?id=w7GaO5s... Once you know the language a bit better, I recommend Fernando Pessoa, Florbela Espanca, Sophia de Mello Breyner Andersen, Eça de Queiróz, Teófilo de Braga, Almeida Garrett... Here you can buy their books in PDF and they're pretty cheap: http://alfarrabio.di.uminho.pt/vercial/e... Also, if you search on Google for, for example, Fernando Pessoa poemas, I think you can find at least some you can read for free. JUst make sure the site is Portuguese and not Brazilian or else you'll confuse your writing.
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Albertine Originally Answered: What is a good book to start with on learning the US, European and the Asian stock market?
Far be it for me to tell you what you want, but having watched newbies appear for more than a decade, I think you want to learn how to invest. If you can learn how to make money, then "how the stock markets work" is immaterial. The back-office workings are only important if you want to work there. It may seem like nit-picking, but a trader is very accurate and specific and an investor less so, but specifics and accuracy are the road to profits, not inaccurate generalities. A newbie is interested in how much money they can make, in general. A trader/investor focuses on risk first. Specifics. A newbie opens an account and buys a stock on a hot tip without knowledge of what they're doing, but a trader/investor develops a trade plan complete with entry triggers and profit targets and stops, and good money management, and tests their plan on a simulator first, while they learn more, before risking a penny. All of the specifics are nailed down with agonizing accuracy, or you'll end up somewhere else, in general. Learn first how to invest. If that works out, you may want to invest another two or three years learning how to become a trader and reading dozens more books. One of the best starter books for investing is Investing For Dummies, available for free from your local library (if you're in the USA). Two really "good" books that are "interesting" are: Schwager, Jack - Stock Market Wizards Lefevre, Edwin - Reminiscences of a Stock Operator - (about Jesse Livermore) Also: "Which Is Better, Buy-and-Hold or Market Timing?" "Do You Have What It Takes to Be a Market Timer Droke, Clif - Technical Analysis Simplified Kahn, Michael N. - Tech. Anal. Plain & Simple Kamich, Bruce M. - How Technical Analysis Works O'Neil, William J.- How to Make Money in Stocks Oz, Tony - How to Make Money From Wall Street Rotella, Robert P. - Elements of Successful Trading, The Nassar, David – Rules of the Trade Sperandeo, Victor - Trader Vic-Methods of a Wall Street Master Wasendorf, Russell - All About Futures Stocks for the Long Run, by Jeremy Siegel Bulls Make Money, Bears Make Money, Pigs Get Slaughtered, by Gallea You can get all of these books at your local library through the Interlibrary Loan system for free. Use Investopedia to define financial terms as you go and learn more and use their simulator. http://www.investopedia.com/university/b... http://yourportfolio101.com/index.html/l... http://www.howthemarketworks.com./ http://stockmarket.makemoneyideas.in/ http://beginnersinvest.about.com/od/investing101/Investing_101.htm http://www.fool.com/school/basics/basics... http://beginnersinvest.about.com/library... http://www.ehow.com/topic_558_investing-for-beginners.html http://www.dummies.com/Section/Content-Search.id-324209.html?query=investment+analysis You can also type “how to invest” in the Search Y! Answers box at the top of this screen and get lots of answers. But you've got the right idea; the best way to learn is from a good book or three, not from a few sentences and paragraphs and snippets from the internet, or sound bites from jokers like Jim Cramer. Never take a hot tip without a track record. Watch CNBC for ideas and numbers, not opinions. Opinions are a dime a dozen and meaningless, because not one single person has ever predicted future price any better than a coin toss. There are dozens of predictions every day on TV, but don't fall for it. Nobody can predict future price in one day, one week, or even one minute. This is the challenge you face: dealing with and preparing for the risk and uncertainty of the future; not unlike life itself. You nor anyone else will ever "know" the future. Keep an open mind to both directions (not just one or your plan), because the future will always be uncertain. Learning to live with uncertainty and handle that is half the challenge. Having an alternative plan for the opposite of what you perceive will save your bacon.
Albertine Originally Answered: What is a good book to start with on learning the US, European and the Asian stock market?
There is a lot of ways to learn how to trade on the Stock market, but you must be little more precise so i can try to help you. For the start you can search on the google some basic staff, you need to figure what type of trading you suits you, so you can find the best book :D Here is a list of useful sites that can help you www.wave-power.net www.investopedia.com finance.yahoo.com/education/stocks‎ marketlive.in/stock-market-tutorials‎ I am technical analyst, my analysis on stock market are based on elliott wave theory, so i can suggest you to read elliott wave principle by frost and prechter... I hope this helped...

Albertine Originally Answered: Is there a difference between Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese from Portugal?
I'm Portuguese. I found this website, and it explains it pretty well. I quote: "Brazilian and European Portuguese are very far apart—from spelling to the use of verb tenses and terminology. In many situations, the use of European Portuguese is unacceptable to Brazilians, and vice-versa. The choice of words can be completely different and sometimes "laughable." This is specially true when it comes to technical texts, where even the choices of "imported" words are different. A Brazilian person can read a book or hear an interview on the radio—but that is the extent of the use of European Portuguese in Brazil. In Portugal, Brazilian Portuguese would carry a lot of "mistakes" and awkward word choices and may often be considered an uncultured variation of the European form. If we are talking about a couple of lines in a packaging (contents, or regulatory info), you could probably use one translation—but you should remember that regulations vary from country to country. If your product is targeted to a specific market niche or widespread use, you should have two translations. Another fact to consider is national pride, that is, the response of a consumer to a product that is obviously not directed to him/her. The good news is that in most subject matters you can have a text translated for one target country and then edited (localized/adapted) for another. The bad news is that this is not a very cost efficient solution; Brazilian and Portuguese translators would rather translate "from scratch" than edit a text translated for another market, since the changes are usually very extensive, and the time required for the task might be longer than the time required to do a normal editing. The relevance of the difference between the two forms of Portuguese doesn't apply to all situations. José Saramago, for instance, is considered a great writer in any of the Portuguese speaking countries (there are eight: Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal, S. Tomé and Príncipe, and East Timor). The more formal the language, the easier to understand it in another Portuguese speaking country; but make no mistake, there is NO such thing as standard Portuguese." If you want to learn the specific differences, go to: http://www.necco.ca/faq_no_longer_camoes...
Albertine Originally Answered: Is there a difference between Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese from Portugal?
Brazilian and European Portuguese are very far apart—from spelling to the use of verb tenses and terminology. In many situations, the use of European Portuguese is unacceptable to Brazilians, and vice-versa. The choice of words can be completely different and sometimes "laughable." This is specially true when it comes to technical texts, where even the choices of "imported" words are different. A Brazilian person can read a book or hear an interview on the radio—but that is the extent of the use of European Portuguese in Brazil. In Portugal, Brazilian Portuguese would carry a lot of "mistakes" and awkward word choices and may often be considered an uncultured variation of the European form.
Albertine Originally Answered: Is there a difference between Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese from Portugal?
There is - portuguese spoken in Brazil has more of an influence from Native Indigenous as well as various African dialects as both those ethnic groups make up a substantial part of the population there.

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