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Seth has 45 pennies. Draw an array that shows how many nickels the pennies are worth?

Seth has 45 pennies. Draw an array that shows how many nickels the pennies are worth? Topic: Math homework third grade
May 22, 2019 / By Brett
Question: lol this is my brothers third grade math homework and i cant remember how to do this exactly, prompt serious answers please. lol this is my brothers third grade math homework and i cant remember how to do this exactly, prompt serious answers please. I am well aware that 45/5=9, the question is about the array.
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Best Answers: Seth has 45 pennies. Draw an array that shows how many nickels the pennies are worth?

Alexina Alexina | 2 days ago
But of course you know that 45 divided by is nine, but as for the array? an array is basically an arrangement of some sort.. seeing that he's in third grade i'm guessing i doesn't have to be profound, so you could simply draw a diagram in which a the top u write 45/5=9 then you could draw 5 pennies, group them together with an arrow of some sort, and draw a nickel underneath. this would signify 5 pennies= 1 nickel. draw this 9x, and there's an array. hope this helps, only what i could think of.
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Alexina Originally Answered: What law says that businesses are required to accept large payments in pennies?
Here's what the law says: The Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues. Foreign gold or silver coins are not legal tender for debts." All this means is that the US Federal Reserve system must honor all US currency. As the US Treasury points out, there's nothing in the law that says that private businesses have to accept it for all transactions. If a merchant wants to sell her products in exchange for gold bullion, nothing but dimes minted before 1946, Swedish fish, or Monopoly money, that's her right under the law.
Alexina Originally Answered: What law says that businesses are required to accept large payments in pennies?
Just because the coins are legal tender does **not** mean any business is required to accept them. You can definitely be refused service for your meal. In this video, the situation may have been trickier. More than anything, he's acting confident about some law that doesn't exist. Around 7:30, he's even saying it's a "federal crime" to not accept currency. That's b.s. But... it also wasn't a negotiated transaction, like when you go into a normal business. His car was towed -- presumably after a police ticket. It can be a big deal when government impounds your property. Since he technically showed up with the payment amount, it's problematic. "Refusing service" means he doesn't get his property back. This guy's stunt pulled at least three police officers off the street when they had better things to do. Other people in similar situations have been cited for things like disorderly conduct. More than anything he got lucky that the police were focused on just maintaining the peace and letting him get his property back. And the tow person probably didn't want to get in trouble for refusing to give him his property.
Alexina Originally Answered: What law says that businesses are required to accept large payments in pennies?
The one that says this money is legal tender for all debts public and private. Not to mention, a penny is a type of US currency and so unless someone says no pennies, they should accept pennies.
Alexina Originally Answered: What law says that businesses are required to accept large payments in pennies?
On youtube,I saw Big Foot. aliens knock down the twin towers, government create hurricanes..youtube is a great source for the..the...the

Alexina Originally Answered: Seth thomas?
Dissertation given by Florence Goodman to the Thomaston Historical Society, April 10, 2000 James Thomas came from Scotland and settled in Farmingbury, now called Wolcott in the late 1700's. He built a one and a half story Cape Cod style, post and beam home (circa 1775) near the James Alcox (Alcott) house on Spindle Hill. He married Martha Barnes, and they had seven children. Seth was the fifth child, and he was born in 1785. The house in which he was born is located on 36 Peterson Lane, which today is just east of the junction of Mad River and Spindle Hill Roads. He lived in that house until about 1810. James Thomas was a cooper by trade, a person who repairs casks and barrels, but he also loved carpentry. From this, Seth probably acquired his interest in carpentry. Seth had a limited formal education and at an early age left school to become a carpenter apprentice to Daniel Tuttle, of Plymouth. It was said that Seth was a man of few words, but great energy and perseverance in any employment in which he engaged. Thus, Seth paid strong attention to the duties of this apprenticeship, and many of the "wild lads" of Wolcott called him "Daniel Tuttle's fool" because of this. After his apprenticeship was completed, Seth became a skillful woodworker and worked building houses and barns in the nearby towns around Wolcott. In the year 1800, Seth attempted to set up a clock-making industry in Wolcott. He made his first clock in his family's house off of Spindle Hill Road. The woods around the house were filled with mountain laurel trees; and many Wolcott men worked cutting the trees and sawing them into thin slices, which, when seasoned, were used for the wooden wheels of the clocks. The women of the town spun flax (cotton) into cords and these were used to hold the clock weights; and so the town of Wolcott profited to some extent from Seth Thomas's enterprise, the short time it was located in Wolcott. Previous to 1807, when Seth Thomas went to work for the firm of Terry, Thomas and Hoadley, at Hoadleyville, he made an offer to a Mr. Daniel Byington, of Wolcott, to purchase mill property on the Mad River. It was believed that the waterpower of Wolcott was superior to that of Plymouth Hollow and this site would have made an excellent location for his mill. He also asked the town to open a road direct to Cheshire for the export of goods that might be manufactured by him. The town did not see the need for such a road and declined his offer, thus, Mr. Thomas became discouraged and went to Hoadleyville, and then on to Plymouth Hollow. In 1807, Seth Thomas joined Eli Terry and Silas Hoadley in a business of making clocks at a wholesale rate. Seth mainly worked on fitting the wheels and different clock parts together. During the years from 1807 until 1810, they made 4000 clocks of the "hang-up" or "wag-on-the wall" type. These clocks did not have cases, but buyers who wanted cases for their clocks hired carpenters to build what they called "grandfather cases" for them. In 1810, Thomas and Terry bought out Hoadley's share of the company and they worked together until 1812. At that time Seth Thomas sold out his share of the company, and went into business on his own in Plymouth Hollow. Thomas also built a mill for rolling brass and making wire that he operated in conjunction with his clock factory. It wasn't until 1853 that the Seth Thomas Clock Company was established. Thomas also purchased the manufacturing rights of the shelf clock from Eli Terry and turned this particular type of clock into a big seller. He mass-produced clocks by using automated methods to build and assemble the components of the clocks. Seth Thomas was married to Philinda Tuttle in the early 1800's. There is little available in our records about his family life, except that he had a son, Seth Thomas, Jr., who went into the clock business with him. It was his son who enlarged the clock factory and developed it into a world business. Seth Thomas died in 1859 in Plymouth. It was at that time that the politicians of Plymouth made the western portion of the town, where the factory was located, into a new town called Thomaston. This information was compiled by Mrs. Florence Goodman, April, 2000 Sources: Badger, Rose Wakelee, Old Wolcott; Orcutt, Rev. Samuel, History of the Town of Wolcott. Connecticut,Waterbury, CT, 1874; Thomas, Seth, Microsoft Encarta 98 Encyclopedia, 1993-97. http://www.tapr.org/~wa1lou/whs/thomas.h... Another great article is located at: http://eh.net/lists/archives/h-business/...
Alexina Originally Answered: Seth thomas?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seth_Thomas... then read the eternal link to help you out at the bottom

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