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Help with noun clauses?

Help with noun clauses? Topic: Noun homework
May 26, 2019 / By Cassidy
Question: I need a bit of help finding the noun clauses in the following sentences: The big green parrot speaks to whoever comes into the house. For many years, no one knew where tuna spawned. On this special night, dinner will be whatever you'd like. The police always give tickets to whoever parks in front of a hydrant. What your room needs is a portable dumpster and a front-loader, young man. And in these sentences, I need to know how the noun clause is used (subject, direct object, indirect object or object of a preposition) Why the group had gathered at the mall was a mystery. I don't know why I said that. Give whoever calls the directions to our house. We will go along with whatever you decide. Practice is how a musician gets to Carnegie Hall. Thank you, Annie! And no, violetb, I don't need homework done. I need an English teacher that doesn't talk to her class and her husband on the phone at the same time. :P
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Best Answers: Help with noun clauses?

Annabel Annabel | 3 days ago
WHOEVER COMES INTO THE HOUSE: Noun clause, obj. prep to. WHERE TUNA SPAWNED: Noun clause, Direct Object of the verb knew. WHATEVER YOU'D LIKE: Noun clause, Predicate Nominative renaming the subject dinner. WHOEVER PARKS IN FRONT OF A HYDRANT: Noun clause, Object of the Preposition to. WHAT YOUR ROOM NEEDS: Noun clause, subject of the verb is. WHY THE GROUP HAD GATHERED AT THE MALL: Subject of was. WHY I SAID THAT: Direct object of the verb do know. WHOEVER CALLS: Indirect object of the verb give. WHATEVER YOU DECIDE: Direct object of the verb will go HOW A MUSICIAN GETS TO CARNEGIE HALL: Predicate nominative renaming the subject practice. I hope this helps. Former English teacher. Chow!!
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We found more questions related to the topic: Noun homework


Annabel Originally Answered: Help with The Clause: Independent Clauses and Subordinate Clauses?
1. C. It describes "artist". 2. D. It tells what and is the object of "about". 3. B. It tells when. 4. D. It tells what. 5. C. It describes "teacher". 6. B. It tells why. 7. C. It has a dependent clause and an independent clause. 8. A. It has two verbs but only one subject. 9. B. It has two independent clauses. You can put "and" instead of the semicolon. 10. B. It has two independent clauses. You can put "but" instead of the semicolon.
Annabel Originally Answered: Help with The Clause: Independent Clauses and Subordinate Clauses?
'but at the poles the change is top notch" is an independent clause. The entire sentence is made from two independent clauses 1) "at the equator, there's not much trade" and 2) "at the poles the difference is exquisite". Each clause can stand independently as grammatically proper sentences. It is just that they're joined collectively into one higher sentence by way of use of the conjunction 'however'. The correct punctuation for joining two impartial clauses is to either put a semicolon between them or to place a comma after the primary unbiased clause, then write the conjunction, then write the 2nd unbiased clause. The way in which you've gotten it punctuated right here (with out the citation marks of direction) is correct.

Winfred Winfred
A clause is a group of words containing a subject and a predicate and forming part of a compound or complex sentence. The following example sentence contains two clauses: "It is cold, although the sun is shining." The main clause is "it is cold" and the subordinate clause is "although the sun is shining". So, in your first sentence, the clauses would be "the big green parrot speaks" and "to whoever comes into the house".
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Winfred Originally Answered: Help with English homework, Clauses and Complex sentences?
It´s pretty easy stuff!! check this out. What you need to do first is identify that each sentence is in fact two sentences. The way to notice this is to find the connector. And so, you have two sentence, S1: the main idea, S2: the complementary idea (the connector is part of the second sentence). If you read, or say, S1 by itself, it is a complete idea - it doesn´t need any help from other sentences to complete its idea: it is an independent sentence. S2, on the other hand, is a dependent sentence. Read it and you will notice is is an incomplete idea - remember the connector is part of S2. Here is an example with the first sentence. |...............S1...................|.... [ The elevator will not move ] [ (unless) both doors are closed. ] S1 is a complete idea by itself - an independent sentence. S2 is a dependent sentence - you read it with the connector and it depends on another sentence to complete its idea. So, for your exercise, you need to underline S2; the dependent sentence. The teacher wants you to be able to notice the parts of a complex sentence (S1 connector S2).
Winfred Originally Answered: Help with English homework, Clauses and Complex sentences?
the dependant clause is a part of the sentence that can't stand alone as a senctence 1. unless both doors are closed. 2. why she quit her second job 3. who returned her lost dog 4. that reveals the her's secret 5. with what we have 6. after all the guests left 7. even though it rained on and off 8. though it was still early 9. what happened next 10. about how tall the robber had been

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