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Beginner Tarot Cards?

Beginner Tarot Cards? Topic: Guide to writing a book for beginners
July 16, 2019 / By Charis
Question: hello everyone ! I am very interested in starting to read tarot cards. Can anyone read them? I have been interested in this for a long time and I finally want to start reading them. What books/cards would be good to start using that aren't too pricey? Also any other advice? Thank you and serious answers only please.
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Best Answers: Beginner Tarot Cards?

Anthia Anthia | 7 days ago
I wrote a introduction guide to reading tarot for beginners and published it online here: http://phuture.me/tarot/tarot-tutor/taro... If you want to practice tarot spreads and reading them with interactive help try this digital tarot deck which I also created. http://phuture.me/tarot/tarot-spread
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Anthia Originally Answered: Tarot cards for the novice?
The most recommended tarot decks to learn from are based on the Rider Waite deck… the Hanson-Roberts deck, Morgan Greer deck and the Fenestra deck are all good decks that are very close to the Rider Waite in their images. Any deck will do though… find one whose images appeal to you and that “speak” to you. More than anything, personal preference should be your first guide. Don't pick an RW clone deck just because you think you aught to... that can kill your appetite for tarot if you find it ugly. To choose a good deck for yourself you’ll want a deck that first of all you find appealing… something that will motivate you to use the cards. More importantly, however, you’ll want a deck that “speaks” to you. Find a sample image of one (or several) of the cards. Ask a somewhat random sample question and then look at the image… how would you answer your question if you pulled that card? If the answer comes fairly easily, then it might be a good deck. If it’s a struggle, then it might not be a good deck for you, even if you find it really beautiful. One effective method of learning tarot is to journal. Go card-by-card through your deck in order and spend some time with each card. Study the image on the card and record your impressions. Break down the symbolism (out loud if you have to) and record what you think it means. Then get out your books… the guidebook that comes with the deck and any other book you have with tarot meanings (at least having one other book can be helpful. I recommend either “Tarot: Your Everyday Guide” bu Jenina Renee or “The Tarot Workbook” by Nevill Drury) and read through the entries while examining the picture on the card. Record whatever information seems important or relevant. When you are through with the deck, go back through your notes and study them… compile a short statement about the card, maybe a couple of sentences describing what you think it means… then see if you can break this down further into a keyword or two that describes the card… this will help the meanings you see by studying the cards stick in your head a little. The next thing you might try is comparing the numbers. Take out all the aces and compare what they mean… the things they have in common will refer to the essential meaning of “ace” and the things that are different about them will refer to the essential meanings of each suit. Go on and do this with the twos, threes etc until you’ve gone through all the minor arcana. I found this to be extremely helpful, myself. Next find a reference for the “Journey of the Fool” and the story about the major arcana and why they are in that particular order and what they symbolize in our greater life’s journey. Journal about the Journey and how you feel about the major arcana… these things were all very helpful to me in my training. To do a reading, leave the book alone. Don’t even keep your guidebook with your deck as you don’t want to be tempted to reference it during the reading. Read from the images, even if you have no experience with the cards. Look at the people on the cards and figure out what they are doing, how they are feeling and what the various symbols might indicate, then try to apply the behaviors and symbols on the card to the situation at hand. Use your intuition to focus on what seems to be the most important and relevant aspect of the image or symbolism. If you’ve never read before, you might be better off leaving more complex spreads alone. Leave the complex 10-card “Celtic Cross” spread for when you are more experienced with the cards and stick with simple spreads like a one-card spread or 3 to 4 card spreads where the positions are fairly easy to figure out. Once you’ve got a better handle on the cards themselves and the positions of your spreads, you can experiment with more complex spreads and trying to read the relationships between the cards. -Scarlet

Zachary Zachary
Hi. I am a professional tarot reader, and tour with New Age shows. I have a website www.nalanisworld.com where you can book a reading or read my tarot tips. But I just created a YouTube channel JUST to teach people how to read tarot. http://www.youtube.com/user/officialrebeltarot I've got 17 videos so far, and one of the first was a video in which I recommended getting the Rider-Waite deck, or a variation of it, like the Universal Waite. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOpVM_3KtfA&feature=plcp For reading, start with "Tarot Plain and Simple" by Anthony Louis. It's clear, detailed and so easy to understand. And you can get it in e-pub format for your smart phone, tablet or e-reader! Good luck.
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Shiloh Shiloh
The most recommended tarot decks to learn from are based on the Rider Waite deck… the Hanson-Roberts deck, Morgan Greer deck and the Fenestra deck are all good decks that are very close to the Rider Waite in their images. Any deck will do though… find one whose images appeal to you and that “speak” to you. More than anything, personal preference should be your first guide. Don't pick an RW clone deck just because you think you aught to... that can kill your appetite for tarot if you find it ugly. To choose a good deck for yourself you’ll want a deck that first of all you find appealing… something that will motivate you to use the cards. More importantly, however, you’ll want a deck that “speaks” to you. Find a sample image of one (or several) of the cards. Ask a somewhat random sample question and then look at the image… how would you answer your question if you pulled that card? If the answer comes fairly easily, then it might be a good deck. If it’s a struggle, then it might not be a good deck for you, even if you find it really beautiful. Most decks are between 15 and 30 dollars. You can find mini decks for a little cheaper, but they're small and can be harder to see. You can find them online or in shops all over the place. One effective method of learning tarot is to journal. Go card-by-card through your deck in order and spend some time with each card. Study the image on the card and record your impressions. Break down the symbolism (out loud if you have to) and record what you think it means. Then get out your books… the guidebook that comes with the deck and any other book you have with tarot meanings (at least having one other book can be helpful. I recommend either “Tarot: Your Everyday Guide” bu Jenina Renee or “The Tarot Workbook” by Nevill Drury) and read through the entries while examining the picture on the card. Record whatever information seems important or relevant. When you are through with the deck, go back through your notes and study them… compile a short statement about the card, maybe a couple of sentences describing what you think it means… then see if you can break this down further into a keyword or two that describes the card… this will help the meanings you see by studying the cards stick in your head a little. The next thing you might try is comparing the numbers. Take out all the aces and compare what they mean… the things they have in common will refer to the essential meaning of “ace” and the things that are different about them will refer to the essential meanings of each suit. Go on and do this with the twos, threes etc until you’ve gone through all the minor arcana. I found this to be extremely helpful, myself. Next find a reference for the “Journey of the Fool” and the story about the major arcana and why they are in that particular order and what they symbolize in our greater life’s journey. Journal about the Journey and how you feel about the major arcana… these things were all very helpful to me in my training. To do a reading, leave the book alone. Don’t even keep your guidebook with your deck as you don’t want to be tempted to reference it during the reading. Read from the images, even if you have no experience with the cards. Look at the people on the cards and figure out what they are doing, how they are feeling and what the various symbols might indicate, then try to apply the behaviors and symbols on the card to the situation at hand. Use your intuition to focus on what seems to be the most important and relevant aspect of the image or symbolism. If you’ve never read before, you might be better off leaving more complex spreads alone. Leave the complex 10-card “Celtic Cross” spread for when you are more experienced with the cards and stick with simple spreads like a one-card spread or 3 to 4 card spreads where the positions are fairly easy to figure out. Once you’ve got a better handle on the cards themselves and the positions of your spreads, you can experiment with more complex spreads and trying to read the relationships between the cards.
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Obadiah Obadiah
well according tarotists you should choose a tarot that you feel is for you, there are many set of cards of tarot and they are the same in the meaning but the images are different, you can pick one from a bookstore according to your feelings, you should start with meditation about the cars, each card with meditation, reading books about the tarot
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Obadiah Originally Answered: I have question for experienced tarot readers: What do you think of tarot apps?
I wouldn't waste my time with tarot apps. Reading the cards is a very personal thing. First you need to find a deck that speaks to you. Then you need to develop your own style of shuffling and picking. Some people spread out the cards and move their finger until they find the hot card. Others, like myself, shuffle twice and cut. Sometimes a card falls out when you are shuffling. I think its better to treat the cards much like you would a violin. Yes, you can synthesize the sounds of a violin, but playing it makes the sounds so much more personal. You might be able to learn about card meanings and reversals on line though.

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