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In state residency?

In state residency? Topic: Case state aid planning
May 20, 2019 / By Chelsie
Question: I'm planning to florida where my grandmother resides. I'm going to go to high school for a senior year, and then go to community college. I wanted to know what are some ways to obtain a scholarship? Also the in-state residency rule i wanted to know that after completion of my senior year in high school how can i prove that i've been a resident in florida for a period of time so that i don't pay out- of state extra fee?
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Best Answers: In state residency?

Ascelina Ascelina | 5 days ago
Some schools have waivers and other things that are acceptions to the out-of-state fees. In my case, I live in Iowa and I'm going to go to a school in Missouri. I live within 100 miles of the school (and had lived there for over a year a few years back) they are going to waive it and i'll get in-state tuition. Just contact your admissions and they'll point you in the right direction to who you need to talk to about that. They will probably also have a paper for you to fill out that to try and get that waived. As for scholarships, contact your school's financial aid office. They usually have scholarships avaliable for you to apply for. I would do this soon because there are important deadlines comming up. Also, apply for your FAFSA if you haven't done that already. http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/ Good luck!
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Ascelina Originally Answered: Divorce Residency Question for California?
She can't file for 6 months after she has established residency in CA. You have a copy of those papers to prove that she considered herself a resident of Nevada. Hold on to those copies. They may prove useful if you want to move jurisdiction to AZ. You already have proof of her residency in AZ despite the fact that she didn't change her driver's license (bank account with your home address for instance). Many people who move to Nevada to file for divorce find that the judge throws it out because they never changed their driver's license and thus had no intent for residence. My guess is that she discovered this and is just blowing smoke. Here's my suggestion. Contact your DMV and find out if she still holds a CA driver's license. If she does, then file for divorce in AZ right now. By not changing her license she has no right to file in Nevada and thus there is no legal filing. I presume you don't want her to file in CA before of the divorce laws there. Seriously look at those Nevada papers and think about how different the requirements would be in CA. It may be worth your while to suck it up and sign them if she really did change her driver's license to NV.

Zefania Zefania
If you work, a copy of your 1040 proving you have been working in the state. A permanent address. A FL driver's license. That would help. Ask the college that you intend to apply to what criteria they need to prove in-state residency.
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Siward Siward
http://www.admissions.ufl.edu/residency/... In my state, residency is regulated at the state level. I'm not 100% sure about Florida. If you call your perspective college, I'm sure someone will answer your questions. They may have a website with this information, too. Best wishes and boy am I jealous!! :)
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Siward Originally Answered: Can I be naturalized even after dad loses his residency status?
Sure. Once you successfully removed conditions and got your 10-year card, you were free as a bird. From that moment on you had green light all the way. But I understand your concern. There is no sorting out, really. Once RoC is approved, the 10-year card is issued. The only way they can take away your dad's residency is by proving fraud, and from your post it appears like that's happening now. "Supended" is not a term that the USCIS uses in this case. But, again, this does not impact you. If you have a 10-year card, you can naturalize, and that's what you should do. Run, Forest, run! P.S. I hope you watched the movie Forest Gump. If you have not, do it ASAP. It's the best move in the history of movies. The best movie, ever.

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